What’s for Lunch?

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I know that i often scare my friends and family with my obsession for good food, but worry not, I’m not writing a review about the best lunch options around our NYC Fullsix office. In the Summer ’07 issue of our Trendwatch keynote, we had dedicated a section to Bite-size entertainment, or how we consume more and more short videos that easily fit in our spare cycles. And these videos redefine lunchtime on the workplace as we know it. If you check your co-workers’ cubicles around 1PM, chances are that most of them will be sitting in front of their screen, a Shrimp Remoulade Wrap in one hand and an XXX Vitamin Water bottle in the other, watching online videos. This sounds like a no-brainer indeed, since watching online short movies doesn’t really require the viewer to use his greasy fingers to type or use the mouse.

And media companies understood this phenomenon and have been starting to respond in the past year. Yahoo! for example launched in July 2006 a show called The 9, featuring the nine top “Web Finds” of the day, ranging from movies excerpt to gossips and weird websites. The 3:30 video compilation has a host (Maria Sansone), a sponsor (Pepsi) and is prepared every morning to be online on time for lunch.

News sites adapt their content to those specific lunch-time viewers. CNN.com will promote lighter videos (Dogs live the high life, or Comedian is living in an Ikea store), while NBC.com will push short-length highlights, versus 30-minute and longer shows in the evening, when the viewers are more available.

Studies show that consumers are more receptive to advertising at lunchtime, but also more willing to purchase the promoted product than any other time of the day. So no doubt that media companies do not hesitate to charge a premium to brands who want to advertise online between noon and 3PM!

via The New York Times

PS: OK, I can’t resist, I highly recommend wichcraft’s awesome goat cheese and avocado sandwich in Manhattan and Chai’s disturbingly cheap and good lunch special for $5.95 in Williamsburg.